Our Mustang Rescue Project : First Little Pasture Finished

We finally got the little pasture ready for Mairsiedotes and let her into it today.  She began grazing immediately, and was peacefully making her way though the tall grass, when suddenly she started bucking and snorting and running around.  Mairsiedotes went a little crazy like that several times.  I wondered if she got stung by a bee or something.

When she was jumping and bucking, she kept farting explosively!  Then I wondered if that sound was what was spooking her!  She was fascinating to watch, cavorting around.  Reminded me a little of watching a kitten play.

I hope she gets along with the two horses we are scheduled to bring in tomorrow.  I’ll let you know.

Our Mustang Rescue Project : Part 9 – She is So Smart!

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This morning, Cheryl went out to check on Princess Mairsiedotes, and found her in the gated stall, the stall she is not supposed to go into.  The stall that holds all the hay, grain in a closed barrel, tack, etc.  She looked up from munching on the open bale of hay as if to say, “Good Morning”.

Cheryl led her out of the stall and shut the latch.  The next time she looked over, Mairsiedotes had unlatched the stall and was inside eating the hay again.  Cheryl led her out again and shut the latch, this time putting a wire through the lock hole and twisting it so she couldn’t get in again.  Cheryl admitted to me that she couldn’t help being proud of how smart Mairsiedotes is.

Later, at dusk, I took Mairsiedotes out of the corral to let her graze on some nice grass in the yard.  She loved that!  When it started getting too dark, I put her back in her open stall with some hay, and turned to go out of the corral.  I had forgotten to shut the gate though, and Princess Mairsiedotes was out of her stall and around me before I knew what was happening.

I hurried after her, but the faster I hurried, the faster she went.  I had flashbacks of when my shetland pony got loose in the alfalfa field one day and didn’t want to be caught.  I had visions of my neighbors and what they would say if I couldn’t catch her, and her galavanting around the neighborhood, through their flowerbeds.  Fortunately, she allowed me to catch up to her when I walked slowly.  I put the lead rope around her neck and coaxed her back into the corral and Cheryl shut the gate.

This horse is no dummy!  One look at her and anyone can see her intelligence.

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Mairsiedotes keeping her eye on me the day Denise brought her to her new home.

Our Mustang Rescue Project : Run In With “The Law”

our loft 3

Everything was going well until “The Man” sashayed into our back yard, clipboard in hand, taking us by surprise.  I knew immediately he was some kind of “inspector” coming to check on some neighbor’s complaint.

“Is this thing under 200 square feet?” He bellowed.

“It’s 12 x 24 feet,” my sister Cheryl answered defensively.

“You know you gotta have a permit for that,” he said, authoritatively.

“No I don’t,” Cheryl told him, impudently.  “I checked with the state laws and it says if we are building a barn or an out building for animals, we can make it any size we want without a permit.”

“Not in Marion county,” he further insisted.

“It’s a state wide law for Oregon,” Cheryl insisted back.  “I checked in two places, in the Portland city planning office in the permits division, and with the lawyer who came to our architecture class to explain the building laws.”

“Well, here in Marion county, you have to file for an exemption to not have to get a permit,” he back-peddled.  “It’s a new ordinance.”

His brusk demeanor shifted to a friendlier one when he saw our little mustang filly.  He was impressed that she was from the real wild mustang herd on Beady Butte.  He complimented us on the quality of our structure, and began reminiscing about his burros and how great they were.  We had a nice jovial visit after that, but he said we needed to go the Marion County permits office and see what they could do to help us work out a plan to bring our structure into compliance with the county rules.

Cheryl researched online about the rules here in MARION county, printed out our site plan, and we went to talk to the folks at the permit building.

Sadly, from what they said, it was true, we would have to get an exemption to build a barn because we are on AR (acreage residential) and not on exclusive farm use land.  We would have to apply to get tax exemptions to have an official farming business to be able to build whatever we wanted on our property.

On the other hand, they said, we could just cut our lean to in half, making sure each side structurally independent from the other, each side being easily under 200 square feet, and we would be in compliance.

That would be the easiest option, we decided.  “How much distance do we need between buildings?” Cheryl asked.

The man held up a piece of paper and said, “If I can slip this paper between the buildings, that would  be far enough.  If we could tear down one structure without pulling the other down, that would be enough separation.”  He grinned and we smiled.

“We can do that,” we said.

We have 20 days to comply.

We left, thinking how silly some rules are.  I suppose they serve a purpose, but for people like us, who tend to fly by the seat of our pants, it just gums up the works.  We are smart enough to make good solid structures, in fact, we tend to over due the structural integrity of the buildings we make, but maybe some people have built things that have collapsed and hurt people.  Whatever.  We will cut it in two.  Then we will build the big, fabulous barn we are planning . . . in little sections, each independent from the others.  So there.

Our Mustang Rescue Project : Run In With "The Law"

our loft 3

Everything was going well until “The Man” sashayed into our back yard, clipboard in hand, taking us by surprise.  I knew immediately he was some kind of “inspector” coming to check on some neighbor’s complaint.

“Is this thing under 200 square feet?” He bellowed.

“It’s 12 x 24 feet,” my sister Cheryl answered defensively.

“You know you gotta have a permit for that,” he said, authoritatively.

“No I don’t,” Cheryl told him, impudently.  “I checked with the state laws and it says if we are building a barn or an out building for animals, we can make it any size we want without a permit.”

“Not in Marion county,” he further insisted.

“It’s a state wide law for Oregon,” Cheryl insisted back.  “I checked in two places, in the Portland city planning office in the permits division, and with the lawyer who came to our architecture class to explain the building laws.”

“Well, here in Marion county, you have to file for an exemption to not have to get a permit,” he back-peddled.  “It’s a new ordinance.”

His brusk demeanor shifted to a friendlier one when he saw our little mustang filly.  He was impressed that she was from the real wild mustang herd on Beady Butte.  He complimented us on the quality of our structure, and began reminiscing about his burros and how great they were.  We had a nice jovial visit after that, but he said we needed to go the Marion County permits office and see what they could do to help us work out a plan to bring our structure into compliance with the county rules.

Cheryl researched online about the rules here in MARION county, printed out our site plan, and we went to talk to the folks at the permit building.

Sadly, from what they said, it was true, we would have to get an exemption to build a barn because we are on AR (acreage residential) and not on exclusive farm use land.  We would have to apply to get tax exemptions to have an official farming business to be able to build whatever we wanted on our property.

On the other hand, they said, we could just cut our lean to in half, making sure each side structurally independent from the other, each side being easily under 200 square feet, and we would be in compliance.

That would be the easiest option, we decided.  “How much distance do we need between buildings?” Cheryl asked.

The man held up a piece of paper and said, “If I can slip this paper between the buildings, that would  be far enough.  If we could tear down one structure without pulling the other down, that would be enough separation.”  He grinned and we smiled.

“We can do that,” we said.

We have 20 days to comply.

We left, thinking how silly some rules are.  I suppose they serve a purpose, but for people like us, who tend to fly by the seat of our pants, it just gums up the works.  We are smart enough to make good solid structures, in fact, we tend to over due the structural integrity of the buildings we make, but maybe some people have built things that have collapsed and hurt people.  Whatever.  We will cut it in two.  Then we will build the big, fabulous barn we are planning . . . in little sections, each independent from the others.  So there.

Our Mustang Rescue Project : Part 7 – She's Here!

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We were working up to the last minute on the stall door when Mairsiedotes arrived at about 3 pm today.  Denise unloaded her from the trailer.

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She seemed curious about everything, sniffing and looking around as Denise led her to our back yard.  Once in the corral, Denise had Cheryl lead her around a bit and gave them a chance to get used to each other in Mairsiedotes’s new surroundings.

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Mairsiedotes seemed satisfied and began grazing.  I brought in a spray hose to spray away some cement dust, and that was interesting to her.  She came closer and watched and then I sprayed in other areas because she liked the wet grass for grazing.

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Ryan brought a big bucket for her water to go into.  He filled it about half full and she drank most of it, so he filled it again.

Mairsiedotes is such a pretty little filly.  I think we will call her Princess Mairsiedotes!

Our Mustang Rescue Project : Part 7 – She’s Here!

IMG_6095

We were working up to the last minute on the stall door when Mairsiedotes arrived at about 3 pm today.  Denise unloaded her from the trailer.

IMG_6100

She seemed curious about everything, sniffing and looking around as Denise led her to our back yard.  Once in the corral, Denise had Cheryl lead her around a bit and gave them a chance to get used to each other in Mairsiedotes’s new surroundings.

IMG_6103

Mairsiedotes seemed satisfied and began grazing.  I brought in a spray hose to spray away some cement dust, and that was interesting to her.  She came closer and watched and then I sprayed in other areas because she liked the wet grass for grazing.

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mairsie3

Ryan brought a big bucket for her water to go into.  He filled it about half full and she drank most of it, so he filled it again.

Mairsiedotes is such a pretty little filly.  I think we will call her Princess Mairsiedotes!

Our Mustang Rescue Project : Part 6 – The Roof

Cheryl and I put the corrugated galvanized metal roof on today, with the very wonderful help of my husband John, and son Matthew. It was fun being up high and getting so much accomplished! We decided we enjoyed putting the roof on more than building the fence.

The galvanized screws came with neoprene washers that squished underneath the hex heads when tightened. This is supposed to stop any leaking. Let’s hope it works!

After the halfway mark, Cheryl and I had to have an ice cream break. 🙂

It’s important to keep our strength up!

We were supposed to bring the Mustang filly here this evening, to her new home, but rain set us back a day, so she will be coming home tomorrow instead.

At first we were discouraged by the overcast and misty sky, but at one point today, the sun peeked out and we were practically blinded, and instantly overheated from the reflection off the silver roofing.  Then we realized what a blessing the overcast sky was.  Boy did we misunderstand!  I thanked God, and the gracious weather, for those perfectly timed clouds!

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Could we be any happier?  I think not!

As young girls, sharing a room, we used to dream about living together and building our own houses.  We would draw our dream designs and imagine living in them.  Between the spiral houses we each built on Spirit Dreamer Mountain (our place in the hills near Cottage Grove), the art studio in Orlando, and this lean to . . . and the glorious barn we are planning, we are living our girl hood dreams!