Half walls in the art studio

As I was beginning to plan where to put all my shelves in the art studio, I realized I didn’t have enough wall space. I decided to build a wall between the two halves of the studio to give me room for all my hanging shelves. I didn’t like how closed off it felt, however, so I cut a large opening in the wall at eye level to open up the space.

Since that leaves me only half a wall when I needed a whole wall, I’m also putting half a wall between the breeze through and the far section of studio. That will allow me to mount all my shelves and still have a view of the entire studio as well as the horse corral and yard.

I thought I would be done with my studio before Thanksgiving but, as I should have known, projects always take 2 to 4 times longer than expected.

Working on the exterior of the cottage art studio.

With a week of sunny days in front of us, I decided it would be best to work on the outside of the art studio. We had a few days of rain and now with a break in the weather I realize I had better take advantage of the dry.

I could have chosen to have new windows but I had collected these old charmers over the past two years and I just love them. They may not be as energy efficient but I can create a barrier if I need to, from the weather, with clear bubble wrap or plastic.

Much of the siding I have used was given to us through Freecycle. I have begun buying new siding now though.

Ceiling almost finished!

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Look how bright the double room is now with the sheet rock up and ready to finish trimming out and painting. John and Ryan and I spent the last two days working as much as possible to get the ceiling in place. There was a lot of prep work to be done: finishing the insulation, spraying some foam insulation into cracks and crevices all over the place, and making sure there were no screws or nails or dried foam in the way of the sheet rock being raised into place. I only missed one little screw which created a little bubble when I hung that piece of ceiling. I had to cut into the bubble and will patch it later.

This time we rented a sheet rock raising tool to help us lift the large heavy Gypsum boards into place. I appreciated having the tool around for lifting the boards, fitting, and cutting them. It rented for $39 a day at Home Depot. We ended up using it for a day and a half.

I was able to work for three hours at a time and then I would have to take a break and have a snack or meal. I’m pretty happy about how much energy I had today. I was dripping with sweat and I felt so dirty when work was through but I feel blissful and tired after my shower, having accomplished so much.

Finally finishing my cottage art studio ceiling.

The first piece of sheet rock is in place!

The insulation you see between the rafters is a stiff foam insulation about 4 inches thick. This came from a greyhound bus station. It was given to my sister Cheryl and I after she found it online. I think she requested insulation through Freecycle. This insulation was bound for the dump but we were able to collect and use it instead.

I am very excited to be working on the designated art studio area in the cottage finally. Once this art studio area is finished I can move all my art supplies out of my very cramped living room studio and into the cottage studio.

Moving my art studio will allow me to open my home back up for family gatherings and more comfortable entertaining of friends. .

I am looking forward to decorating my house for the holidays this year ūüôā

How crude can it be and still work?

The day was warmer, and Melanie was over, so John and Melanie and I finally put the front door in on the art studio cottage.




Watch video below to see how amazingly it works!

 

 

Making a Cottage Art Studio : Part 6 – Old Ladies Mixing Concrete

Me mixing concrete in a tub

As Cheryl and I continue working along this southern wall, taking out paneling and putting in windows and French doors (I know, the North side is better for lighting an art studio, but we have a South side to use so we’re using it), we are finding that almost everywhere along the base of these walls, the pressure treated wood is rotten. ¬†Not only is the wood rotten in this particular spot, there is no concrete below the rotten wood either!

We are removing the rotten wood, bit by bit, and “pouring” concrete in the empty spaces that should have had concrete from the beginning. ¬†Cheryl and I have to take this job in small bites because we are mixing the concrete by hand, and that is a tough job, especially for old ladies like us.

The little space you see prepped for concrete will hold just the amount I have mixed in this photo, which is about half a bag.  Maybe one day I will rent a little concrete mixer if I have a large area to fill.

Cheryl and I have limited energy but we don’t let that stop us from accomplishing our goals. ¬†We work for only very short periods of time, like an hour at a time, which is why this project will likely take us forever. ¬†Not only that, but we are both pretty sure we have that attention deficit hyperactive disorder thing. ¬†This may be obvious to those reading my blogs. ¬†I tend to jump from one project to another, one subject to another, then back again. ¬†That is how we work best though. ¬†Our brains go fizz, fizz, fizz, then we have to lay down and rest!

Making A Cottage Art Studio: Part 3 – A Perfectly Imperfect Guest Cottage


My sister finished her term at school and has come to stay with me for the summer. This little bit of heaven, the partially finished corner of my cottage art studio, is perfect for her bohemian spirit. She loves to feel the breeze at night and watch the stars as she goes to sleep.