The new barn is going up. 

Yesterday evening we worked in the cool of the late part of the day. We had Ryan helping to place the hurricane ties for the rafters.

The last two nights I’ve had dreams where the 6 tons of hay we bought were being rained on! Makes me feel a great sense of urgency to get the haybarn part finished and the hay in it.

We have the floors and corner posts in the for the haybarn structures and the roof will be going on soon.

Another toy for Ryan and me. 

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I borrowed a friends tractor and had a great time grading our back half acre.

We smoothed out the pasture area and created a nice slope in the new barn area where we will be building this summer. Also, spent some time smoothing out the old garden to extend our grassy back lawn.

The new barn area will have a solid run of packed gravel base and pea gravel on top to keep the horses feet out of the mud this winter.  We will also have a hay barn included so that we won’t have to drag the hay on dollys through the rain to the barn!

We are building 12 small structures to make our new barn. Each structure is under 200 ft.² and can stand alone.

I drew so many plans before I finally settled on one. The planning is so fun.

I kind of love projects. 

Mairsiedotes Gets Some Much Needed Rest

When we brought Honey and Bae home, we kept them separate from Mairsiedotes because we were not sure how well they would get along, and Mairsiedotes, being only a year old, is much smaller than the older horses.  So we alternated which horses stayed in the corral and which stayed in the pasture.  This allowed them to interact through the fence without the risk of fighting.  After a while we saw the horses would prefer to stand by each other by the fence in the hot summer sun than stand in the shade away from each other, so we put them together and watched them all move to the shade.

Thepecking order was established, of course, with Honey as top mare, Mairsiedotes as second, and Bae on the bottom.  Things were all right though, until we stopped letting them into the pasture due to rain and mud.  We kept the horses in the corral because the corral has a base of hog fuel and fir shavings to keep their feet out of the mud. And we want to keep them out of the small pasture to keep the small pasture from becoming a mud pit.  Unfortunately, the small corral was not big enough for the three of them to abide peaceably together and Mairsiedotes was getting the brunt of Honey’s nips and kicks.

Knowing this problem cannot continue, Cheryl and I finished Mairsiedotes stall today so she could rest without fear tonight.

Cheryl said Mairsiedotes laid down (in her stall) for the first time since the pasture became off limits.  Then when she was done resting, she stood up and went near the other horses who were both standing near her stall wall.  They wanted to be near each other, and could interact over the short wall, but Mairsiedotes could feel safe from Honey’s picking on her.

Our Mustang Rescue Project : First Little Pasture Finished

We finally got the little pasture ready for Mairsiedotes and let her into it today.  She began grazing immediately, and was peacefully making her way though the tall grass, when suddenly she started bucking and snorting and running around.  Mairsiedotes went a little crazy like that several times.  I wondered if she got stung by a bee or something.

When she was jumping and bucking, she kept farting explosively!  Then I wondered if that sound was what was spooking her!  She was fascinating to watch, cavorting around.  Reminded me a little of watching a kitten play.

I hope she gets along with the two horses we are scheduled to bring in tomorrow.  I’ll let you know.

Our Mustang Rescue Project : Part 7 – She's Here!

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We were working up to the last minute on the stall door when Mairsiedotes arrived at about 3 pm today.  Denise unloaded her from the trailer.

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She seemed curious about everything, sniffing and looking around as Denise led her to our back yard.  Once in the corral, Denise had Cheryl lead her around a bit and gave them a chance to get used to each other in Mairsiedotes’s new surroundings.

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Mairsiedotes seemed satisfied and began grazing.  I brought in a spray hose to spray away some cement dust, and that was interesting to her.  She came closer and watched and then I sprayed in other areas because she liked the wet grass for grazing.

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Ryan brought a big bucket for her water to go into.  He filled it about half full and she drank most of it, so he filled it again.

Mairsiedotes is such a pretty little filly.  I think we will call her Princess Mairsiedotes!

Our Mustang Rescue Project : Part 7 – She’s Here!

IMG_6095

We were working up to the last minute on the stall door when Mairsiedotes arrived at about 3 pm today.  Denise unloaded her from the trailer.

IMG_6100

She seemed curious about everything, sniffing and looking around as Denise led her to our back yard.  Once in the corral, Denise had Cheryl lead her around a bit and gave them a chance to get used to each other in Mairsiedotes’s new surroundings.

IMG_6103

Mairsiedotes seemed satisfied and began grazing.  I brought in a spray hose to spray away some cement dust, and that was interesting to her.  She came closer and watched and then I sprayed in other areas because she liked the wet grass for grazing.

IMG_6131

mairsie3

Ryan brought a big bucket for her water to go into.  He filled it about half full and she drank most of it, so he filled it again.

Mairsiedotes is such a pretty little filly.  I think we will call her Princess Mairsiedotes!

Our Mustang Rescue Project! : Part 1 – Post Holes

Son Matthew adding weight to the auger, Cheryl in the background, Daughter Melanie running the machine.  This little Toro Dingo was great and it also has a scraper attachment for grading the ground.  The scraper worked great too.

My sister Cheryl, the architect, has devised a plan to rescue a mustang horse. We are digging the fence posts for the corral today.

Her thesis describes using materials that have been taken down from their previous lives and she wants to repurpose them into shelter and barn for the horses. She’s been asking for donations on line through Freecycle and craigslist, and has received many free items.

Terra cotta roofing tiles donated to yhe project.
Heavy timbers for the barn donated.
Donated wood.

It’s important I stay in my Zen place while we work on this, though. I am instrumental in a way, but it’s easier on my nervous system to think of myself as a helper. I rest when I need to and help when I can.