Mairsiedotes Gets Some Much Needed Rest

When we brought Honey and Bae home, we kept them separate from Mairsiedotes because we were not sure how well they would get along, and Mairsiedotes, being only a year old, is much smaller than the older horses.  So we alternated which horses stayed in the corral and which stayed in the pasture.  This allowed them to interact through the fence without the risk of fighting.  After a while we saw the horses would prefer to stand by each other by the fence in the hot summer sun than stand in the shade away from each other, so we put them together and watched them all move to the shade.

Thepecking order was established, of course, with Honey as top mare, Mairsiedotes as second, and Bae on the bottom.  Things were all right though, until we stopped letting them into the pasture due to rain and mud.  We kept the horses in the corral because the corral has a base of hog fuel and fir shavings to keep their feet out of the mud. And we want to keep them out of the small pasture to keep the small pasture from becoming a mud pit.  Unfortunately, the small corral was not big enough for the three of them to abide peaceably together and Mairsiedotes was getting the brunt of Honey’s nips and kicks.

Knowing this problem cannot continue, Cheryl and I finished Mairsiedotes stall today so she could rest without fear tonight.

Cheryl said Mairsiedotes laid down (in her stall) for the first time since the pasture became off limits.  Then when she was done resting, she stood up and went near the other horses who were both standing near her stall wall.  They wanted to be near each other, and could interact over the short wall, but Mairsiedotes could feel safe from Honey’s picking on her.

The Hay Got Wet!

 

This morning when I came out to feed the horses I noticed the hay was wet. Yesterday it rained all day, and the water seeped through the unprotected boards that are the walls of the barn. That is bad. Nobody wants wet moldy hay!

As you can see in this photo, the walls are not complete, and there is no protective siding yet to keep the hay dry.

Breeze through area with hay and saddle areas along the left wall.

When I woke I noticed that the day had dawned glorious and sunny, though the weather report said rain. I seized the day. The sunshine meant we could work in dry conditions as we put siding up on the barn. The siding will keep the inside walls dry which in turn will keep the hay dry, and the tack, and everything else. I’m so delighted with the beautiful weather today.

img_2613
The siding we are using was donated by a man in Washington.  I am using cement based siding on the lower rows, and wood pressed siding on the upper rows.

 

Juliana brushing Bae in the area soon to be stalls.